Tag Archive | conference calling

Avaya Ventures into a Virtual Reality

On February 10th, Avaya launched a new on-demand, cloud-based option of its immersive web collaboration platform Avaya web.alive. The platform is available both as a premises-based solution and a SaaS offering, the latter being the focus of the new announcement, along with some new features and capabilities.

This new solution presents a virtual reality, which, in some ways, resembles the virtual event platforms (such as those offered by ON24, InXpo and Unisfair) but uses avatars and game-like tools and experiences, more similar to Second Life. I’ve heard some define the “traditional” (only in the context of this fast-evolving space) virtual platforms as virtual events and the likes of Second Life – as virtual environments. The monikers don’t matter much, but there are some differences, which we intend to tackle in more detail in a forthcoming study.

It’s great that Avaya is offering a free web-based demo. Anyone can try the environment at  http://avayalive.com/tryit. It will be beneficial for end users to experience this unique, advanced technology first-hand before considering a full-fledged deployment or even a serious pilot. As an analyst, I was privileged to have several sessions with the Avaya team, but I am hearing that there is almost always someone in there who can help random visitors find their way through the different tools and functionalities.

For me, who’s never (NEVER) played any computer games or experienced 3D, doesn’t like Sci-Fi (didn’t even fully appreciate Avatar or The Matrix),… (the list goes on, but you get the idea) … this was both a thrilling and somewhat distracting experience. I did not take the time to test the environment before the pre-launch and ventured into it with a male avatar. Of course, I heard little from the presentation in the first few minutes because I was busy changing my gender and choosing my facial features and clothes to wear.

The next challenge was finding my way around the environment and learning how to control my avatar using the mouse and keypad. Eventually, I found myself standing all by myself in front of the speaker with my head spinning in different directions trying to find the best viewpoint. Somehow, using a 3-rd person view, with my avatar still proudly standing in front of the whole crowd, I managed to get my eyesight so low that I was staring upwards into people’s … well, lower backs. Toward the end of the event, though, I was boldly strolling around the environment, magically walking through people and furniture. And shouting. Until I realized it was not a good idea, because others could hear me without me noticing they were there.

I’ll end the story here and just briefly summarize what I liked and what I would wish to see improved going forward.

The things I liked:

  • Such virtual environments are fun! It makes you giddy to design your persona (without the help of cosmetic surgery) and watch yourself from a third person point of view (there must be a split-personality tendency in all of us).
  • You do get the impression that you are “meeting” with people in a quasi-realistic social environment, unlike the sensation one gets using more “traditional” conferencing tools.
  • I liked seeing the pictures of the people I was close by or talking to, in addition to their oversexed avatars.
  • I really liked the presentation and collaboration capabilities. I was able to easily share my desktop and saw demonstrations of video feeds and slide presentations.
  • I like the fact that there are private rooms and people can have meetings behind closed doors. Only authenticated users have access to these rooms, but they can authenticate others. Once you are inside the room and the door is closed, no one else can hear the conversation OR see into the room.
  • Also, a group engaged in a more private conversation in the public area can use a whisper mode, which is not audible to those at a greater distance but does not degrade the quality of the conversation for the main parties.
  • Regardless of my “mishaps” facetiously recounted above, the environment is fairly intuitive and does not take a whole lot of learning to be able to navigate through it.
  • I have to give credit to the Avaya people, too – they offered help and were prepared to patiently address all kinds of questions.
  • From a business point of view, this solution has tremendous advantages as a web-based, on-demand platform. It is easy to deploy and use, even for small businesses, and is quite cost-effective at $49/month for a single account holder and up to 8 people attending at any given time.
  • The platform also offers analytics tools that can help businesses assess the value they are receiving from enhanced collaboration.

What I would want to see improved:

  • These visual environments can be very distracting. I heard people saying the virtual experience helped them avoid multi-tasking. In fact, I noticed I was more focused on what was taking place on the screen, but was it really the RIGHT thing on the screen I was watching/doing? I found myself checking people out (some were wearing funky outfits), rather than watching the slides. Maybe there should be a way for the speaker or person managing the event to help/force attendees to focus on the presentation screens whenever appropriate? I would not propose a dress code – that would be taking it too far J
  • There need to be some additional privacy options. I discussed the private rooms in the section above, but I believe there should be a way to “encapsulate” people who wish to have a more private conversation in the public area. I imagine, visually it could be something like the Avaya Flare spotlight. In a real-life environment, such as in a typical conference facility, people always complain there aren’t enough meeting rooms and end up looking for these two-armchairs-and-a-table isolated areas in the hotel corridors to have a private chat. At a cocktail party, people use facial expressions and body language to keep unwanted parties out of their private conversation. But the virtual environment needs different tools. I am told that users can see who’s within listening area by watching the number next to an ear icon at the bottom of the screen. But people tend to get distracted or too engaged in a conversation to pay attention. So they need to be able to take precautions.
  • Changing your voice, gesturing and other functions are only a right-click away. But I would want to see them in a menu bar – similar to a browser or Microsoft Office experience. It’s all about familiar, user-friendly interfaces, right?
  • There needs to be an option to mute everybody (for both the organizers and the attendees), except the speaker. It is distracting when people are chatting around you. Is it like real life? Yes, but we always try to improve real life, don’t we?
  • You have to hit Escape to be able to use some of the Options and to do other things on your desktop. It becomes bothersome, if you still want to do some multi-tasking.
  • If you have a slow DSL or cable connection, the audio can get garbled. (I had the rare luck to have my Internet service switched to a new provider right in the middle of the launch!)
  • Training, training, training!! Yes, it is intuitive; yes, younger generations will figure it out quickly and enjoy it. But for effective business use across different generations and types of users, organizations adopting this tool will need to strongly encourage employees to attend demos and brief training sessions. I have been told that Avaya does offer training. I think customers should not underestimate the value of a proper introduction to the new tool and ensure employees become familiar with key features and functionalities to avoid disappointment and misuse.

Go ahead and try it and let me know what you think. But don’t forget to mute yourself (press M on your keyboard) as you enter the environment or else someone can overhear your business conversations, kids shouting or dogs barking.

Are there other similar platforms you like better? Why?

37signals and Gaboogie Mashup Contest

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Developers, build a mashup application or mashup your existing application using both the Highrise API and the Lypp API and win stuff.

Best app:

  • $3000 Apple gift certificate
  • 20,000 minutes of call time from Lypp (approx value: $1800)
  • 12 months subscription for a Highrise MAX account (approx value: $1800)

Runner-up:

  • $1500 Apple gift certificate
  • 10,000 minutes of call time from Lypp (approx value: $900)
  • 6 months subscription for a Highrise MAX account (approx value: $900)

2nd Runner-up:

  • $500 Apple gift certificate
  • 5,000 minutes of call time from Lypp (approx value: $450)
  • 3 month subscription for a Highrise MAX account (approx value: $450)

Application for entries: April 1 to May 1
Winners announced: May 15

more here..
http://blog.lypp.com/2008/02/26/37signals-and-gaboogie-mashup-contest/

Audio Conferencing API

 

Conference Calling and Audio Conferencing APIs are not exactly abundant, likely because conference calling has long been a boring and mundane task that few people enjoy. That smell of martial disdain was not exactly motivating developers to come up with a better solution.

Gaboogie aims to up the happy factor considerably with the upcoming launch of Lypp: Next Generation Conference Calling and version 2.0 of the Lypp API.

The conferencing features for Lypp are vast and the API is dead simple to use, if you know XML you are set.

Stay tuned for more on that during the first couple of weeks of February.

Lypp Wins "Best in Voice Services Category" at Under the Radar Mobility Conference

Update: It's official, Lypp Wins Best in Voice Services Category at Under the Radar Mobility Conference 

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Lypp Co-founder – Daniel Gibbons won the hearts of the judges today. During his presentation of Lypp mobile voice services at the Under the Radar Mobility Conference it became apparent that Dan was no fan of the "give it away for free and make it up in volume" tactics some of the other service providers have been adopting.

The Panel.. 

Dan went on to deliver a great presentation on how Lypp is delivering simple group calling and conference calling services for mobile users and how we plan to expand on that service and the accompanying API in the coming months.

Well done partner!

Gaboogie Embraces Open Source For New Mobile Group Calling and Conference Calling Solution

 

Ruby on Rails, Adhearsion and CentOS create launch pad for new mobile conferencing application.  

Vancouver, Canada, August 1, 2007 – Gaboogie (www.gaboogie.com) announced today the integration of open-source Adhearsion v0.80 written in Ruby, leveraging the existing Ruby on Rails Gaboogie software engine running on CentOS Linux as the platform for a new Gaboogie Mobile offering.

Jay Phillips, founder of Adhearsion, has been on site at Gaboogie for the past several weeks integrating Adhearsion into the new Gaboogie application. Adhearsion is an open source, unconventional framework that ties technologies together neatly. Adhearsion is most noted as being “adhesion you can hear” for integrating VoIP by building atop Digium's Asterisk PBX software. Adhearsion was designed to “understand” the many elements of the VoIP picture and both improve them individually and tie them together in one comprehensive solution.

"The majority of the initial Gaboogie application was written in Ruby because we wanted to utilize open source rapid application development technologies favored in the web 2.0 development community," commented Co-Founder of Gaboogie, Erik Lagerway.

"By implementing Adhearsion on top of FreeSWITCH and rounding out the rest of our own feature set using Ruby on Rails we were able to create a much more maintainable code base. I believe that we have now set the stage for future Gaboogie feature development and deployment. The first of the features to be made available using this new architecture will be Gaboogie Mobile, a sub-set of Gaboogie features created for mobile conferencing and mobile group calling. Gaboogie Mobile is scheduled for release in the fall of this year."

Gaboogie is a unique conference calling and group calling service that allows users to schedule calls that automatically CALL YOU and your attendees. All Gaboogie calls also include toll-free dial-in numbers and attendee passcodes for traditional conference calling access. Gaboogie can call participants in over 70 countries, including the US, Canada, all EU countries, Australia, New Zealand, Japan and many other locations in Europe, the Americas and Asia.

Gaboogie: Start On Time
www.gaboogie.com

 

For more information about Gaboogie and Gaboogie Mobile:
Erik Lagerway
Gaboogie
Email Gaboogie
+1 (604) 629-7991

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Gaboogie at DemoCamp Vancouver 01

Dan and I were happy to be selected to participate in last night's inaugural DemoCamp Vancouver.

Dan.. on fire!

Check out the video of Dan at center stage.

More on Gaboogie at DemoCamp at the gaboogie blog

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