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Google’s open WebRTC media stack ported to QNX / Blackberry 10

WebRTC on QNX

The WebRTC media stack has been ported to QNX / Blackberry 10 as reported hy Hookflash in this Press Release below.

This does not mean that WebRTC browsers will now begin communicating with Blackberry apps written using the Open Peer SDK, well… not today anyhow.  What it does mean is Blackberry 10 developers can write apps using this new SDK to enable P2P voice, video and messaging, across Blackberry and iOS platforms using their own user identity model or mashed up with social identities.

In the sample app (pictured above) running on a production Z10 and a Alpha Z10 device, Facebook was used to map IDs.

Here is the Press Release…

BlackBerry Live 2013, Orlando Florida – May 13, 2013 – Hookflash announces beta availability of Open Peer Software Development Kit (SDK) for BlackBerry® 10, providing developers with an effective way to integrate high quality, secure, real-time, voice, video and messaging into their own BlackBerry 10 applications.

“The Open Peer SDK for BlackBerry 10 enables a completely new generation of communications integration on the BlackBerry 10 platform,” explains Hookflash co-founder Erik Lagerway. “The Hookflash team has worked tirelessly to build this toolkit and port the WebRTC libraries to BlackBerry 10. BlackBerry developers and enterprise customers can now integrate high quality, real-time, peer-to-peer (P2P), voice, video and messaging into their own BlackBerry 10 applications. People just want good quality voice, video and text communications embedded in whatever they’re doing. Open Peer enables progressive developers in medical, finance, gaming, travel and many other verticals with this next evolution of integrated P2P communications on BlackBerry 10 smartphones.”

“BlackBerry is committed to our app partners through an open ecosystem, strong platform and commitment to supporting innovation and invention,” said Martyn Mallick, VP of Global Alliances and Business Development at BlackBerry. “We are pleased to have Hookflash bring Open Peer to BlackBerry 10, enabling developers to add rich peer-to-peer communications in their apps, and enhance the customer experience.”

The Open Peer SDK for BlackBerry 10 is the most recent addition to the Open Peer, open source family of real-time P2P communications toolkits. The BlackBerry 10 SDK joins the existing C++ and iOS SDKs already available. Mobile developers creating applications across multiple platforms can now leverage the suite of Open Peer toolkits to deliver real-time P2P communications for all of their applications. The Open Peer SDKs are available in open source and can be found on Github (http://github.com/openpeer/).

Hookflash is a globally distributed software development team building “Open Peer”, new “open” video, voice and messaging specification and software for mobile platforms and web browsers. Open Peer enables important new evolution of communications; Open, for developers and customers to create with. “Over-the-top” via the Internet, where users control their economics and quality of service. “Federated Identity” so users can find and connect without limitations of service provider’s walled gardens and operating systems and “Integrated”, communications as a native function in software and applications. Hookflash founders, lead developers and Advisors previous accomplishments include; creators of the world’s most popular softphones, built audio technology acquired and used in Skype, created technology acquired and open sourced by Google to create WebRTC, and engaged inWebRTC standards development in the IETF and W3C.

Developers can register at (http://hookflash.com/signup) to start using the Open Peer SDK today.

For more information and an Open Peer/WebRTC white paper on please visit Hookflash http://hookflash.com

Press Contact:
Trent Johnsen
Hookflash
Press@hookflash.com
855-HOOKFLASH (466-5352) ext 1

Hookflash enables real-time social, mobile, and WebRTC communications with “Open Peer” for integration of voice, video,  messaging and federated identity into world leading software, enterprise, applications, networks, mobile and computing devices. Hookflash and Open Peer are trademarks of Hookflash Inc. BlackBerry and related trademarks, names and logos are the property of Research In Motion Limited. BlackBerry is not responsible for any third-party products or services. Skype is a trademark of Microsoft. Google is a trademark of Google. Other company and product names may be trademarks of their respective owners.

(full disclosure, I work for Hookflash)

Hookflash | Ottawa – looking for a few good engineers!

Join Us!

  • C++ Core Engineer
  • JAVA Server Engineer
  • Senior iOS Engineer
  • WebRTC Browser Developer

Email join@hookflash.com with your resume.

Build MVP (minimum viable product). Ship now! Bull shit.

We can all learn something from Mr. Jobs, “Make it better, make it simple, make people want it!”. I don’t think he ever said that, but it feels like he is saying that directly to me every time I pick up my iPhone. From what I have read and heard, Steve was a magician designer, motivator, visionary, savior and brilliant marketeer. I seriously doubt anyone ever heard Steve say, “Let’s ship minimum viable product!”.

There is a major difference between MVP and KISS (Keep It Simple Stupid). Building complex products and services that look and feel “simple” is really hard! MVPs are basically alpha builds at hookflash.  I guess it all depends on what you are building and what your goals are but for me, shipping “minimum viable product” always left me feeling a bit weak. If you are going to ship something that you want people to fall in love with and use every day, you will need to spend time reiterating before you even get to market. It will not be easy and it will always end up taking longer than you predicted. I am not saying that the Angry Birds and iFart apps aren’t successful but when it comes to clearing space on my iOS device, they are the first to go.

Wired recently published a great article on their blog, ‘Ship Today, Update Tomorrow’: The Modern Tablet Credo. I won’t spoil the read (and it’s a good one) but for me it identifies a developing trend that undermines value in new products and services. Why ship it if it’s sadly lacking features and functionality? So you can buy yourself some time? Kindle Fire has shaken up the tablet market but only the market will decide if they deserve a second chance.

Seth Godin had a great article that touched on this as well, “When “minimal viable product” doesn’t work“, excerpt below..

One of my favorite ideas in the new wave of programming is the notion of minimal viable product. The thought is that you should spec and build the smallest kernel of your core idea, put it in the world and see how people react to it, then improve from there.

For drill bits and other tools, this makes perfect sense. Put it out there, get it used, improve it. The definition of “minimal” is obvious.

Often, for software we use in public, this definition leads to failure. Why? Two reasons: read more on Seth’s blog.

Remember the old adage, “You never get a second chance to make a first impression.”

1 year ago, FaceTime will be OPEN

Anyone else remember this? FaceTime was to be OPEN, that was a year ago. Still nothing. FaceTime uses the open standards, but it is not “OPEN”, meaning nobody else can play along.

How long is it going to take before we see Apple living up to their commitments? Hopefully not long, I for one would love to see a FaceTime (and iMessage) API.

WebRTC is live. Flash, take cover!

Update 2: To the hundreds/thousands of repetitive spam tweets / twits, “Will WebRTC replace / kill Skype”, the answer is NO!! It will not. WebRTC is using broken Jingle in the browser, it does not support chat and can only make and receive calls., there is no buddy / contact list to speak of etc etc. NO it will not replace Skype. Stop with the spam tweets already, please!

Update: It seems to me that until all the browsers are on board, native clients will be required to make this go. Which is not outside the realm of possibility, considering Google has open sourced the GIPS audio and video engine along with WebRTC.

Something to remember, WebRTC is not RTCWEB! It may sound silly but it’s true. WebRTC is a Google-centric project using Google code etc.  RTCWEB is essentially an IETF effort, a working group driving towards open real-time communications on the web. They are not the same, which can be rather confusing.

— Original Post —

Google has been busy it would seem, last night WebRTC appeared to the public for the first time. This has some pretty serious implications for Flash, which was the de-facto technology one had to use to get real-time communications in a browser, that has now been circumvented, at least to a certain degree.

The sessions are not run by a signaling protocol per se, not Jingle, no XMPP, not SIP not anything we have seen before. All the session management looks to be coming from libjingle. Which, to me means Jingle is in the browser.

A few early comments:

1. Where does Google stand on websockets? Google have said they will block it if an exploit emerges.

2. Chrome, Opera & Firefox are the supported browsers. Where does Safari and IE land? My guess is that Microsoft will not be in any hurry to implement this considering their recent Skype acquisition.

3. Web-cam captures from HTM5 has not been ratified, although this is likely not as serious as the former points.

IETF 80 – Prague mobile roaming no workie, SIP to the rescue

Well, I am a little sad that I have to turn ON international mobile roaming with Bell in order to get my mobile phone working here, which it is still not, but all is not lost. I have been using FaceTime over the WifI on my MacBook Air and iPhone 4 to call my business partner and my wife back home. Kinda fitting actually, FaceTime is standards based and is all about SIP and RTP etc. Now if we can just get them to open up that API…

Keep on smiling!

What's on your desktop? Now there's an app for that, thanks to the Mac App Store.

The new Mac App Store is launching today it would seem, although one needs to install the new 10.6.6 OSX to get it. Will the new Mac App Store have the same profound effect on our desktop that the existing app store had on mobile apps? Likely not. iPhones, iPod Touches, iPads are mobile devices and usually accompany their users on every outing, not so with laptops and desktops.

With that being said we will likely see a great number of apps from the existing App Store make it into the Mac App Store.

First thoughts around this are positive for me. I like apps that update themselves, as a developer it would also be helpful not having to build up an ecomm system as I suspect in-app purchases will accompany the new SDK for apps in the Mac App Store as well. Of course, Apple will take a healthy chunk of the revenue from the app.

At any rate, apps on iPhones, iPods, iPads will now be ubiquitous across (nearly) all Mac devices.

What do you think? Will this revolutionize the app distribution methodology for desktop apps? Or is this just another cash grab from Apple?

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